Curating and Presenting Lasting Literature: WWU's Bellingham Review

Art installation on a mint green background with giant red and orange textured block letters that read write on

WHEN
Wednesday, March 10, 2021
12:00 p.m. (Pacific Standard Time)

LOCATION
Online

PRICE
Free


 

Check out this video to watch the Curating and Presenting Lasting Literature: WWU's Bellingham Review.

Curating and Presenting Lasting Literature: WWU's Bellingham Review

Brought to you in partnership with the College of Humanities and Social Sciences Dean's Lecture Series and the WWU Alumni

Western’s literary journal, the Bellingham Review, publishes fiction, poetry, nonfiction and hybrid writing. We feature quality U.S. literature along with writing, often dissident writing, from areas like Hong Kong, Israel, Palestine, Cuba, Russia, and West Africa, much newly translated. Many of our authors go on to receive major literary awards, with some of our international authors finding the Review among their first U.S. publications. We seek out under-represented work here in our country, including poetry by the undocumented and incarcerated. Work published by our authors has been reprinted in Harper’s and the Utne Reader, and our new food-during-covid feature, Resilient Pieholes, got a shout-out from The New York Times
 
The Review is staffed by a faculty editor-in-chief, Susanne Paola Antonetta, and graduate students who serve in other editorial functions. This webinar includes Susanne, managing editor MFA candidate Stephen Haines, and previous assistant managing editor and MFA graduate Jai Dulani discussing the daily functions of such a literary journal, how we create collaborations between faculty and graduate students, and how we create relationships with writers in this country and across borders.

Susanne Paola Antonetta

Susanne Paola Antonetta

Speaker

Susanne Paola Antonetta is a professor of English who teaches courses in creative writing, with a specialty in creative nonfiction, in addition to courses for WGSS. Susanne’s forthcoming books are The Terrible Unlikelihood of Our Being Here (OSU 21st Century Essays series), and The Devil's Castle (Counterpoint). She is also the author of Make Me a Mother, Curious Atoms: A History with Physics, Body Toxic, A Mind Apart, the novella Stolen Moments, and four books of poetry. 

Awards for her writing include a New York Times Notable Book, an American Book Award, a Library Journal Best Science book of the year, an Oprah Bookshelf listing, a Pushcart prize, and others. Her essays and poems have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The UK Independent, OrionThe New Republic and many anthologies. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Bellingham Review. For more, go to susantonetta.com.

Jau Dulani

Jai Dulani

Speaker

Jai Dulani is a graduate from Western's MFA program in writing who served as the 2019-2020 Assistant Managing Editor of the Bellingham Review and continues to serve as a collaborative editor. A Pushcart-nominated multi-genre writer, Dulani's work has appeared in or is forthcoming in Alaska Quarterly Review, Best New Poets 2020, The Offing, Waxwing, Foglifter, No Tokens and elsewhere. He has received fellowships from Kundiman, VONA/Voices, and the Asian American Writers’ Workshop. 

Stephen Haines

Stephen Haines

Speaker

Stephen Haines is an MFA student at Western Washington University and the Managing Editor of Bellingham Review. His creative work has been shortlisted at Epoch Press and has appeared or is forthcoming in Adelaide, Creative Colloquy, Bright Flash, and the Scholar’s Week showcase at WWU.

Marc Geisler

Dr. Marc Geisler

Moderator

In 2013, Marc became the Associate Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. A faculty member at Western since 1992, he served as department chair of the English Department for seven years. Previously, he served the English Department as associate chair for three years and director of Graduate Studies for four years. He is a specialist in British Renaissance literature and critical theory and teaches courses in contemporary critical and cultural theory, Milton and nonconformist literature, early modern feminism, early modern patronage and popular culture, Shakespeare, Spenser, politics and literature, and cultural studies. He received his master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of California, Irvine.

Questions and Accommodations

Contact Susanna Glatz, Administration and Communication Assistant, College of Humanities and Social Sciences for this event. Feel free to email at glatzs@wwu.edu or call (360) 650-3707 if you have any questions or comments.

There will be auto-captions available for this event. To request closed captions, please mark the request on the registration form. Advance notice of three days to one week is appreciated.