A Scientific Strategy Towards a Healthier World

Silhouette of two bicycle riders against a dusky sky

WHEN
Thursday, December 2, 2021
11:00 a.m. (Pacific Time)

LOCATION
Online
Zoom

PRICE
Free


 

Science + Communication + Decision Makers = Positive Change
 

A Speaker Series:
Toxicology and Societies
The Impacts of Chemicals in Our Lives

Brought to you in partnership with Huxley's Institute of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry and the WWU Alumni Association

Please join us for the next speaker in our series on Toxicology and Societies: The Impacts of Chemicals in our Lives.

Arlene Blum, working with the Green Science Policy Institute, has contributed to protecting human and environmental health from harmful chemicals in everyday products worldwide. This includes reducing the unnecessary use of flame retardants in furniture, baby products, and electronic cases as well as fluorinated chemicals (PFAS)in carpets and food packaging.

The Institute’s initiates innovative scientific research, communicates the results widely, sharing with decision makers in business and government. During Blum’s illustrated talk, she will tell some of her favorite stories; discuss scientific strategies for positive change; and how to increase the impact of scientific research papers.  

Our vision in developing this series was to support a better understanding of something that affects all of us. There are over 300,000 chemicals being produced and used in almost everything we wear, eat, and drink. How can you ever hope to understand when and where you or your family might be at risk from some of these chemicals? The short answer is, you can’t know everything about all of these substances, but you can learn more about how toxicology (the study of toxic substances) affects you and your society.

This seminar series aims to help you better appreciate, understand, and evaluate the many ways that manufactured chemicals interact with all humans on Earth.

More information about the speaker series is available here.

We have moved to a new event system! We encourage you to create a new profile and login when you register for this and future events, however, you are not required to login to register. If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact us at alumni@wwu.edu and we will help you update your information. Thank you for joining us, and we'll see you soon!

Arlene Blum

Arlene Blum

Speaker

Arlene Blum PhD, biophysical chemist, author, and mountaineer is a Research Associate in Chemistry at UC Berkeley and executive director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute’s scientific research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and PFAS in children's sleepwear, furniture, electronics, and other products world-wide.

Arlene Blum led the first American—and all-women’s—ascent of Annapurna I, considered one of the world’s most dangerous and difficult mountains, co-led the first women’s team to climb Denali; completed the Great Himalayan Traverse across the mountain regions of Bhutan, Nepal, and India; and hiked the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She is the author of Annapurna: A Woman’s Place and Breaking Trail: A Climbing Life. More information at www.greensciencepolicy.org and www.arleneblum.com.

Ruth Sofield

Ruth Sofield

Co-Host

Ruth Sofield is a Professor of environmental toxicology and chemistry in the Huxley College of the Environment. She received her Ph.D. and M.S. in Environmental Science and Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines. Ruth’s research group focuses on the effects of water and air pollution. Their current projects include the aquatic toxicity of microplastic and tire wear particles, and the use of moss as a biomonitoring tool for particulate matter. Ruth is a member of the Puget Sound Partnership Science Panel and the President of the Pacific Northwest Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

Tracy Collier

Tracy Collier

Co-host

Tracy Collier received his Ph.D. in Fisheries Sciences from the University of Washington. He has worked for over 45 years as a toxicologist, with more than 35 of those years spent at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center, where he served as the director of a science division that employed up to 100 people, covering several disciplines, including environmental toxicology, analytical chemistry, harmful algal blooms, and watershed processes. He has over 175 scientific publications, and currently is an affiliate faculty at Western.

Questions and Accommodations

Contact the WWU Alumni Association for this event. Feel free to call at (360) 650-3353 or email at alumni@wwu.edu if you have any questions or comments.

There will be auto-captions available for this event. To request closed captions, please mark the request on the registration form. Advance notice of three days to one week is appreciated.